Category: Social TV

02
Apr

The Year Social Media Moves Beyond Social

This essay originally appeared on the Percolate Blog.

Social is entering a new era in the history of its communications potential. In doing so, ‘social media’ companies like Facebook and LinkedIn are briskly redefining their identities, business models and the boundaries they are able to connect people — or brands to people — within. All told, 2015 looks more and more like the year social will formally move beyond social, and the time when advertisers and technologists stop talking about a company, marketing channel, event or job title as ’social,’ and, instead, simply describe it as something that is.

After all, what is or isn’t social anymore? Facebook, YouTube and Twitter are now closely interwoven throughout all modern media — from live event and TV experiences to journalism to federal government policy awareness — and thanks to mobile are now first screen centers of attention.

How do you define a social company? Today, Facebook generates more annual advertising revenue than Fox News, CNN or MSNBC, with a much faster underlying growth rate fueled by mobile device adoption and budget reallocation to digital.

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As we’ve talked about in the past, Facebook is also distancing itself from its own company pages and contest tabs, becoming a modern media company that connects people and serves ads across a network that extends well beyond Facebook.com. And if the definition of a social company is as open-ended as one that creates or facilitates interactive communities, brands as diverse as Amazon, eBay, Uber, Github, Kickstarter, Venmo, Medium, Pandora, Spotify and a litany of other companies are also intrinsically social businesses. ‘Social’ is where people spend time on the internet, it’s what people intrinsically want to do in their lives and with their phones, and it’s been a central element of human behavior for thousands of years.

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23
Jan

Why Twitter Isn’t Saving Television

“Social TV” is hot right now.  Twitter is strategically building studio relationships, major consumer brands are engineering Super Bowl ad campaigns around second screen experiences, data companies targeting the intersection of online audience engagement and ad dollars are attracting considerable investor interest and everyone from Microsoft to Time Warner is dipping their toe into the new overnight sensationalism surrounding big media conversation.  But while it’s fairly easy to affirm that the future of TV looks highly social, with tremendous opportunity for fostering content-centric dialogue and [re-]targeting, it’s a lot less clear how much “tomorrow TV” looks like the present in terms of platform, players and economic allocation.  One thing that’s already clear though, is Twitter (and GetGlue, BlueFin Labs et al.) isn’t saving traditional TV from considerable current and future disruption, for three reasons:Continue Reading..